compelling-photos-for-your-ads

9 easy tips to take compelling Photos for your Ads

Posted on October 24, 2016 by Tesla in Web Design | 0 comments | 2133 Views

Facebook recently put together 8 easy tips that will help you take good photos that can get noticed. I want to add just one more which will definitely help you create the most appealing Photos to promote your brand.

You know your business better than anyone else and  understand what your customers like and don’t like. That insight can help you determine what types of pictures might get their attention, such as images of your business location or photos of happy customers using your new products and services. With that in mind, you can take photos that will work best in your ads.

Bellow are 8 tips from Facebook and the last one is a tip from me.

 think-mobile-first  keep-it-simple
Think mobile first
Before using a picture in your ad, look at it on your smartphone and ensure your main subject is clear and any writing, such as a sign, is legible. That’s key because your audience could be among the over 1 billion people using Facebook on mobile devices daily
Keep it simple
Don’t assume you need to come up with an idea that requires several people, multiple props, and complicated staging. The most effective images are often the simplest ones. For example, take photos of how you create unique fabrics for your clothing.
 follow-the-rule-of-thirds  try-varied-perspectives
Follow the rule of thirds
Pictures are more interesting when their subjects are not placed in the center. Your subject should be closer to either side, or along the top or bottom. This is the rule of thirds. An exception: Faces can be anywhere in the frame and bigger is generally better
Try varied perspectives; watch your edges
Mix big and small things and try different perspectives to create an interesting contrast. For example, try putting one subject close to the camera and others in the background. Keep your subjects away from frame edges so you don’t risk them being cut off.
 use-interesting-layouts  add-a-focal-point-and-varied-textures
Use interesting layouts
When arranging objects for a photo, such as a grouping of women’s shoes and accessories, try using an interesting layout. Consider organizing multiple objects neatly to create an appealing design and photograph the display from above.
Add a focal point and varied textures
When photographing scenery, whether it’s a landscape or a storefront, put a subject in the foreground that provides a focal point, like a group of shoes in front of a display. When possible, use varied textures that create an interesting contrast.
 light-and-shadow-create-a-nice-contrast  use-attractive-color-combinations
Light and shadow create a nice contrast
Pay attention to your scene’s lighting. Bright light and deep shadows create a stark contrast that can make your photo more interesting. For example, you can make an image interesting by placing someone wearing your products in front of a sun-drenched window with sheer curtains.
Use attractive color combinations
Keep a color wheel handy and use it to create interesting color combinations when selecting subjects for a photo. Use colors on opposite sides of the wheel, or try warm and cool versions of the same color. Dress people or choose objects according to your selected colors.

Look for repeating patterns

hacking_photography_repeating_patterns

And here is the tip from me. Look for repeating patterns.

As you walk around, take notice of buildings, windows, patterns in brickwork, etc. I was walking by a building I walk by all the time and something suddenly ‘clicked’ and I realized there was a really cool pattern in the brickwork I had never noticed before. I ran home and grabbed my camera to shoot it before I forgot again.

Ever hear someone say that a photographer “just has the eye for it?” I disagree. This is a learned skill, not something that you are born with. So practicing your skills with this tips in mind will definitely improve your final result.

Let me know if you know of some other tips that are worth mentioning.